New Vehicle Emissions Scheme (VES) In 2018
17/03/2017
Tags : Cars, Driving, News



Credit: carboncleaningusa.com

The air in Singapore by January 2018 is certainly going to be cleaner as a new Vehicle Emissions Scheme (VES) will take effect - placing tax surcharges on more cars and could possibly end the sale on diesel cars. This new VES will replace the current CEVS scheme.

In a report published by the Straits Times, the new scheme administered by the National Environment Agency will be even stricter on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions as well as four other pollutants - hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide and particulate matter.

 

Getting a used Land Rover Defender Diesel on the market could be a bad thing as it emits up to 266g/km or more of CO2. Credit: jackbaruth.com

Then again diesels models will be banded based according to their worst-performing pollutant. Five bands listed as A1, A2, B, C1, and C2, are the best to the worst emitting. As an example, assuming your vehicle's worst performing pollutant is less than 90g/km of CO2, your vehicle will be eligible for a rebate of S$20,000. But if your vehicle falls under the C2 band that emits more than 2mg/km of particulate matter, you will have an additional S$20,000 surcharge. While diesels are known for their low carbon dioxide levels, because of the inclusion of pollutants like nitrogen oxide and particulate matter, diesel car prices would be affected the most with surcharges, as these are known to be higher on these cars. 

 

For petrol variants, only electric models are likely to qualify for the top rebates of S$20,000 and S$30,000 for cars and taxis, respectively. But there will be a grid emission factor to take into account the CO2 generated for electricity to charge these battery-powered vehicles.

While petrol vehicle owners think that all is good for them, even stricter inspections will begin from 1st April 2018 - where vehicles will have to emit even less carbon monoxide than current levels and will also adhere to a new hydrocarbons cap. The revised standards should reduce carbon monoxide emissions by 55 per cent and hydrocarbon emissions by 50 per cent. For motorbikes and older cars, less stringent standards will apply.

 

Want to know more about the current Carbon Emissions based Vehicle Scheme? Click here to find out more!

Wanna make it easier to drive around town in August? Click here to check out Singapore's largest EV Car Sharing Programme!

 

This article in part was first published on the Straits Times here.


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